Call for Papers – Symposium on Human Dynamics in Smart and Connected Communities: Agents – the ‘atomic unit’ of social systems?

Call for Papers – Symposium on Human Dynamics in Smart and Connected Communities: Agents – the ‘atomic unit’ of social systems?

We welcome paper submissions for our session(s) at the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting on 5-9 April, 2017, in Boston.

Session Description:

By defining a social system as a collection of agents, individuals and their behaviors/decisions become the driving force of these systems. Complex global phenomena such as collective behaviors, extensive spatial patterns, and hierarchies are manifested through agent interaction in such a way that the actions of the parts do not simply sum to the activity of the whole. This allows unique perspectives into the inner workings of social systems, making agent-based modelling (ABM) a powerful and appealing tool for understanding the drivers of these systems and how they may change in the future.

What is noticeable from recent applications of ABM is the increase in complexity (richness and detail) of the agents, a factor made possible through new data sources and increased computational power. While there has always been ‘resistance’ to the notion that social scientists should search for some ‘atomic element or unit’ of representation that characterizes the geography of a place, the shift from aggregate to individual mark agents as a clear contender to fulfill the role of ‘atom’ in social simulation modelling. However, there are a number of methodological challenges that need to be addressed if ABM is to fully realize its potential and be recognized as a powerful tool for policy modelling in key societal issues. Most pressing are methods to accurately identify, represent, and evaluate key behaviors and their drivers in ABM.

We invite any papers that contribute towards this wide discussion ranging from epistemological perspectives of the place of ABM, extracting behavior from novel and established data sets to new, intriguing applications to establishing robustness in calibrating and validating ABMs.

Please e-mail the abstract and key words with your expression of intent to Andrew Crooks (acrooks2@gmu.edu) by 22nd October, 2016 (one week before the AAG session deadline). Please make sure that your abstract conforms to the AAG guidelines in relation to title, word limit and key words and as specified at:

An abstract should be no more than 250 words that describe the presentation’s purpose, methods, and conclusions.

Timeline summary:

  • 20th October, 2016: Abstract submission deadline. E-mail Andrew Crooks by this date if you are interested in being in this session. Please submit an abstract and key words with your expression of intent.
  • 24th October, 2016: Session finalization and author notification
  • 26th October, 2016: Final abstract submission to AAG, via www.aag.org. All participants must register individually via this site. Upon registration you will be given a participant number (PIN). Send the PIN and a copy of your final abstract to Andrew Crooks. Neither the organizers nor the AAG will edit the abstracts.
  • 27th October, 2016: AAG registration deadline. Sessions submitted to AAG for approval.
  • 5-9th April, 2017: AAG Annual Meeting.

Organizers:

  • Andrew Crooks, Department of Computational and Data Sciences, George Mason University.
  • Alison Heppenstall, School of Geography, University of Leeds.
  • Nick Malleson, School of Geography, University of Leeds
  • Paul Torrens, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Tandon School of Engineering, New York University.
  • Sarah Wise, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA), University College London.

Continue reading »

Call for Papers – Symposium on Human Dynamics in Smart and Connected Communities: Agents – the ‘atomic unit’ of social systems?

Call for Papers – Symposium on Human Dynamics in Smart and Connected Communities: Agents – the ‘atomic unit’ of social systems?

We welcome paper submissions for our session(s) at the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting on 5-9 April, 2017, in Boston.

Session Description:

By defining a social system as a collection of agents, individuals and their behaviors/decisions become the driving force of these systems. Complex global phenomena such as collective behaviors, extensive spatial patterns, and hierarchies are manifested through agent interaction in such a way that the actions of the parts do not simply sum to the activity of the whole. This allows unique perspectives into the inner workings of social systems, making agent-based modelling (ABM) a powerful and appealing tool for understanding the drivers of these systems and how they may change in the future.

What is noticeable from recent applications of ABM is the increase in complexity (richness and detail) of the agents, a factor made possible through new data sources and increased computational power. While there has always been ‘resistance’ to the notion that social scientists should search for some ‘atomic element or unit’ of representation that characterizes the geography of a place, the shift from aggregate to individual mark agents as a clear contender to fulfill the role of ‘atom’ in social simulation modelling. However, there are a number of methodological challenges that need to be addressed if ABM is to fully realize its potential and be recognized as a powerful tool for policy modelling in key societal issues. Most pressing are methods to accurately identify, represent, and evaluate key behaviors and their drivers in ABM.

We invite any papers that contribute towards this wide discussion ranging from epistemological perspectives of the place of ABM, extracting behavior from novel and established data sets to new, intriguing applications to establishing robustness in calibrating and validating ABMs.

Please e-mail the abstract and key words with your expression of intent to Andrew Crooks (acrooks2@gmu.edu) by 22nd October, 2016 (one week before the AAG session deadline). Please make sure that your abstract conforms to the AAG guidelines in relation to title, word limit and key words and as specified at:

An abstract should be no more than 250 words that describe the presentation’s purpose, methods, and conclusions.

Timeline summary:

  • 20th October, 2016: Abstract submission deadline. E-mail Andrew Crooks by this date if you are interested in being in this session. Please submit an abstract and key words with your expression of intent.
  • 24th October, 2016: Session finalization and author notification
  • 26th October, 2016: Final abstract submission to AAG, via www.aag.org. All participants must register individually via this site. Upon registration you will be given a participant number (PIN). Send the PIN and a copy of your final abstract to Andrew Crooks. Neither the organizers nor the AAG will edit the abstracts.
  • 27th October, 2016: AAG registration deadline. Sessions submitted to AAG for approval.
  • 5-9th April, 2017: AAG Annual Meeting.

Organizers:

  • Andrew Crooks, Department of Computational and Data Sciences, George Mason University.
  • Alison Heppenstall, School of Geography, University of Leeds.
  • Nick Malleson, School of Geography, University of Leeds
  • Paul Torrens, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Tandon School of Engineering, New York University.
  • Sarah Wise, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA), University College London.

Continue reading »

AAG: Symposium on Human Dynamics Research – Urban Analytics

Urban Analytics Sessions @ the AAG 2016
 
As part of the Symposium on Human Dynamics Research we have organized three great sessions sessions relating to Urban Analytic which will take place on Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 1:20 PM – 7:00 PM in Union Square 18, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor.
Session Description: A deluge of new data created by people and machines is changing the way that we understand, organize and model urban spaces. New analytics are required to make sense of these data and to usefully apply findings to real systems. This session seeks to bring together quantitative or mixed methods papers that develop or use new analytics in order to better understand the form, function and future of urban systems. We invite methodological, theoretical and empirical papers that engage with any aspect of urban analytics. Topics include, but are not limited to:
  • New methodologies for tackling large, complex or dirty data sets;
  • Case studies involving analysis of novel or unusual data sources;
  • Policy analysis, predictive analytics, other applications of data;
  • Intensive modelling or simulation applied to urban areas or processes;
  • Individual-level and agent-based models (ABM) of geographical systems;
  • Validating and calibrating models with novel data sources;
  • Ethics of data collected en masse and their use in simulation and analytics.

Organizers:

3445 Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics (I)

Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 1:20 PM – 3:00 PM in Union Square 18, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

Chair:Nick Malleson

Talks:

Discussant: Mark Birkin

3545 Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics (II)

Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 3:20 PM – 5:00 PM in Union Square 18, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

Chair: Paul Longley

Talks:

3645 Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics (III) 

Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 5:20 PM – 7:00 PM in Union Square 18, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

Chair: Andrew Crooks

Talks:

Discussant: Andrew Crooks 

Continue reading »

AAG: Symposium on Human Dynamics Research – Urban Analytics

Urban Analytics Sessions @ the AAG 2016
 
As part of the Symposium on Human Dynamics Research we have organized three great sessions sessions relating to Urban Analytic which will take place on Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 1:20 PM – 7:00 PM in Union Square 18, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor.
Session Description: A deluge of new data created by people and machines is changing the way that we understand, organize and model urban spaces. New analytics are required to make sense of these data and to usefully apply findings to real systems. This session seeks to bring together quantitative or mixed methods papers that develop or use new analytics in order to better understand the form, function and future of urban systems. We invite methodological, theoretical and empirical papers that engage with any aspect of urban analytics. Topics include, but are not limited to:
  • New methodologies for tackling large, complex or dirty data sets;
  • Case studies involving analysis of novel or unusual data sources;
  • Policy analysis, predictive analytics, other applications of data;
  • Intensive modelling or simulation applied to urban areas or processes;
  • Individual-level and agent-based models (ABM) of geographical systems;
  • Validating and calibrating models with novel data sources;
  • Ethics of data collected en masse and their use in simulation and analytics.

Organizers:

3445 Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics (I)

Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 1:20 PM – 3:00 PM in Union Square 18, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

Chair:Nick Malleson

Talks:

Discussant: Mark Birkin

3545 Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics (II)

Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 3:20 PM – 5:00 PM in Union Square 18, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

Chair: Paul Longley

Talks:

3645 Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics (III) 

Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 5:20 PM – 7:00 PM in Union Square 18, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

Chair: Andrew Crooks

Talks:

Discussant: Andrew Crooks 

Continue reading »

Call for papers: Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics at the 2016 AAG

Call for papers: AAG 2016. San Francisco. 29th March – 2nd April

Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics

A deluge of new data created by people and machines is changing the way that we understand, organise and model urban spaces. New analytics are required to make sense of these data and to usefully apply findings to real systems. This session seeks to bring together quantitative or mixed methods papers that develop or use new analytics in order to better understand the form, function and future of urban systems. We invite methodological, theoretical and empirical papers that engage with any aspect of urban analytics. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • New methodologies for tackling large, complex or dirty data sets;
  • Case studies involving analysis of novel or unusual data sources;
  • Policy analysis, predictive analytics, other applications of data;
  • Intensive modelling or simulation applied to urban areas or processes; 
  • Individual-level and agent-based models (ABM) of geographical systems; 
  • Validating and calibrating models with novel data sources; 
  • Ethics of data collected en masse and their use in simulation and analytics.

Please e-mail the abstract and key words with your expression of intent to Nick Malleson (n.s.malleson@leeds.ac.uk) by 22nd October, 2015 (one week before the AAG session deadline). Please make sure that your abstract conforms to the AAG guidelines in relation to title, word limit and key words and as specified at:

http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers

An abstract should be no more than 250 words that describe the presentation’s purpose, methods, and  conclusions.

Timeline summary:

  • 22nd October, 2015: Abstract submission deadline. E-mail Nick Malleson by this date if you are interested in being in this session. Please submit an abstract and key words with your expression of intent.
  • 25th October, 2015: Session finalization and author notification
  • 28th October, 2015: Final abstract submission to AAG, via www.aag.org. All participants must register individually via this site. Upon registration you will be given a participant number (PIN). Send the PIN and a copy of your final abstract to Nick Malleson. Neither the organizers nor the AAG will edit the abstracts.
  • 29th October, 2015: AAG registration deadline. Sessions submitted to AAG for approval.

Organizers

  • Nick Malleson, School of Geography, University of Leeds  
  • Alex Singleton, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool  
  • Mark Birkin, Director of the University of Leeds Institute for Data Analytics (LIDA)  
  • Paul Longley, Department of Geography, University College London  
  • Andrew Crooks, Department of Computational and Data Sciences, George Mason University.   
  • Seth Spielman, Geography Department, University of Colorado
Continue reading »

Call for papers: Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics at the 2016 AAG

Call for papers: AAG 2016. San Francisco. 29th March – 2nd April

Symposium on Human Dynamics Research: Urban Analytics

A deluge of new data created by people and machines is changing the way that we understand, organise and model urban spaces. New analytics are required to make sense of these data and to usefully apply findings to real systems. This session seeks to bring together quantitative or mixed methods papers that develop or use new analytics in order to better understand the form, function and future of urban systems. We invite methodological, theoretical and empirical papers that engage with any aspect of urban analytics. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • New methodologies for tackling large, complex or dirty data sets;
  • Case studies involving analysis of novel or unusual data sources;
  • Policy analysis, predictive analytics, other applications of data;
  • Intensive modelling or simulation applied to urban areas or processes; 
  • Individual-level and agent-based models (ABM) of geographical systems; 
  • Validating and calibrating models with novel data sources; 
  • Ethics of data collected en masse and their use in simulation and analytics.

Please e-mail the abstract and key words with your expression of intent to Nick Malleson (n.s.malleson@leeds.ac.uk) by 22nd October, 2015 (one week before the AAG session deadline). Please make sure that your abstract conforms to the AAG guidelines in relation to title, word limit and key words and as specified at:

http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers

An abstract should be no more than 250 words that describe the presentation’s purpose, methods, and  conclusions.

Timeline summary:

  • 22nd October, 2015: Abstract submission deadline. E-mail Nick Malleson by this date if you are interested in being in this session. Please submit an abstract and key words with your expression of intent.
  • 25th October, 2015: Session finalization and author notification
  • 28th October, 2015: Final abstract submission to AAG, via www.aag.org. All participants must register individually via this site. Upon registration you will be given a participant number (PIN). Send the PIN and a copy of your final abstract to Nick Malleson. Neither the organizers nor the AAG will edit the abstracts.
  • 29th October, 2015: AAG registration deadline. Sessions submitted to AAG for approval.

Organizers

  • Nick Malleson, School of Geography, University of Leeds  
  • Alex Singleton, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool  
  • Mark Birkin, Director of the University of Leeds Institute for Data Analytics (LIDA)  
  • Paul Longley, Department of Geography, University College London  
  • Andrew Crooks, Department of Computational and Data Sciences, George Mason University.   
  • Seth Spielman, Geography Department, University of Colorado
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AAG 2015 notes – day 3 – Civic Technology, Citizen Science, Crowdsourcing and mapping

The sessions today covered Civic technology, citizen science, and the new directions in mapping – Open Source/Crowdsourcing/Big Data First, Civic technology: governance, equity and inclusion considerations, with Pamela Robinson – Ryerson University (Chair) and Peter A. Johnson – University of Waterloo, Teresa Scassa – University of Ottawa and Jon Corbett – University of British Columbia-Okanagan. The Discussant is Betsy Donald – … Continue reading AAG 2015 notes – day 3 – Civic Technology, Citizen Science, Crowdsourcing and mapping

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AAG 2015 notes – day 2 – Public Participation GIS symposium

The second day was dedicated to reflections on Public Participation GIS or Participatory GIS. The day was organised by Rina Ghose and Bandana Karr with some comments from Renee Sieber and me at some stage. It turned out to be an excellent symposium. The following are my notes from the different talks during the day. Jon … Continue reading AAG 2015 notes – day 2 – Public Participation GIS symposium

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AAG 2015 notes – day 1

At 8:00 I’ve attended the Digital Connectivity, Inclusion, and Inequality at the World’s Economic Peripheries  session asking ‘what difference people expect better connectivity to make at the world’s economic peripheries’. I took notes from the presentations of Nancy Ettlinger, Dorothea Kleine and Lisa Poggiali. Nancy Ettlinger analysed crwodsourcing from governance perspective – using Foucauldian analysis. She looks at … Continue reading AAG 2015 notes – day 1

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Geosimulation and Big Data: A Marriage made in Heaven or Hell?

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/101753272804937744/
Call for papers: AAG 2015 – Geosimulation and Big Data: A Marriage made in Heaven or Hell?

In recent years, human emotions, intentions, moods and behaviors have been digitized to an extent previously unimagined in the social sciences. This has been in the main due to the rise of a vast array of new data, termed ‘Big Data’. These new forms of data have the potential to reshape the future directions of social science research, in particular the methods that scientists use to model and simulate spatially explicit social systems. Given the novelty of this potential “revolution” and the surprising lack of reliable behavioural insight to arise from Big Data research, it is an opportune time to assess the progress that has been made and consider the future directions of socio-spatial modelling in a world that is becoming increasingly well described by Big Data sources.

We invite methodological, theoretical and empirical papers that that engage with any aspect of geospatial modelling and the use of Big Data. We are particularly interested in the ways that insight into individual or group behavior can be elucidated from new data sources – including social media contributions, volunteered geographical information, mobile telephone transactions, individually-sensed data, crowd-sourced information, etc. – and used to improve models or simulations. Topics include, but are not limited to:
  • Using Big Data to inform individual–based models of geographical systems;
  • Translating Big Data into agent rules;
  • Elucidating behavioral information from diverse data;
  • Improving simulated agent behavior;
  • Validating agent-based models (ABM) with Big Data;
  • Ethics of data collected en masse and their use in simulation.
Please e-mail the abstract and key words with your expression of intent to Nick Malleson by 28th October, 2014. Please make sure that your abstract conforms to the AAG guidelines in relation to title, word limit and key words and as specified at http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers. An abstract should be no more than 250 words that describe the presentation’s purpose, methods, and conclusions as well as to include keywords.

Organizers

  • Alison Heppenstall, School of Geography, University of Leeds
  • Nick Malleson, School of Geography, University of Leeds
  • Andrew Crooks, Department of Computational Social Science, George Mason University
  • Paul Torrens, Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland
  • Ed Manley, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College London

Timeline

  • 28th October, 2014: Abstract submission deadline. E-mail Nick Malleson by this date if you are interested in being in this session. Please submit an abstract and key words with your expression of intent.
  • 31st October, 2014: Session finalization and author notification
  • 3rd November, 2014: Final abstract submission to AAG, via www.aag.org. All participants must register individually via this site. Upon registration you will be given a participant number (PIN). Send the PIN and a copy of your final abstract to Nick Malleson. Neither the organizers nor the AAG will edit the abstracts.
  • 5th November, 2014: AAG registration deadline. Sessions submitted to AAG for approval.

 

Continue reading »

Geosimulation and Big Data: A Marriage made in Heaven or Hell?

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/101753272804937744/
Call for papers: AAG 2015 – Geosimulation and Big Data: A Marriage made in Heaven or Hell?

In recent years, human emotions, intentions, moods and behaviors have been digitized to an extent previously unimagined in the social sciences. This has been in the main due to the rise of a vast array of new data, termed ‘Big Data’. These new forms of data have the potential to reshape the future directions of social science research, in particular the methods that scientists use to model and simulate spatially explicit social systems. Given the novelty of this potential “revolution” and the surprising lack of reliable behavioural insight to arise from Big Data research, it is an opportune time to assess the progress that has been made and consider the future directions of socio-spatial modelling in a world that is becoming increasingly well described by Big Data sources.

We invite methodological, theoretical and empirical papers that that engage with any aspect of geospatial modelling and the use of Big Data. We are particularly interested in the ways that insight into individual or group behavior can be elucidated from new data sources – including social media contributions, volunteered geographical information, mobile telephone transactions, individually-sensed data, crowd-sourced information, etc. – and used to improve models or simulations. Topics include, but are not limited to:
  • Using Big Data to inform individual–based models of geographical systems;
  • Translating Big Data into agent rules;
  • Elucidating behavioral information from diverse data;
  • Improving simulated agent behavior;
  • Validating agent-based models (ABM) with Big Data;
  • Ethics of data collected en masse and their use in simulation.
Please e-mail the abstract and key words with your expression of intent to Nick Malleson by 28th October, 2014. Please make sure that your abstract conforms to the AAG guidelines in relation to title, word limit and key words and as specified at http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers. An abstract should be no more than 250 words that describe the presentation’s purpose, methods, and conclusions as well as to include keywords.

Organizers

  • Alison Heppenstall, School of Geography, University of Leeds
  • Nick Malleson, School of Geography, University of Leeds
  • Andrew Crooks, Department of Computational Social Science, George Mason University
  • Paul Torrens, Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland
  • Ed Manley, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College London

Timeline

  • 28th October, 2014: Abstract submission deadline. E-mail Nick Malleson by this date if you are interested in being in this session. Please submit an abstract and key words with your expression of intent.
  • 31st October, 2014: Session finalization and author notification
  • 3rd November, 2014: Final abstract submission to AAG, via www.aag.org. All participants must register individually via this site. Upon registration you will be given a participant number (PIN). Send the PIN and a copy of your final abstract to Nick Malleson. Neither the organizers nor the AAG will edit the abstracts.
  • 5th November, 2014: AAG registration deadline. Sessions submitted to AAG for approval.

 

Continue reading »

Call for Papers: New Directions in Geospatial Simulation

New Directions In Geospatial Simulation
The geospatial simulation community has enjoyed steady growth over the past decade as novel and advanced forms of agent-based and cellular automata modeling continue to facilitate the exploration of complex geographic problems facing the world today. It is now an opportune time to consider the future direction of this community and explore ways to leverage geospatial simulation in professional arenas. The aim of these sessions is to bring together researchers utilizing agent-based and cellular automata techniques and associated methodologies to discuss new directions in geospatial simulation. We invite papers that fall into one of the following four categories:
  • Graduate student geospatial simulation research
  • Methodological advances of agent-based or cellular automata modeling
  • New application frontiers in geospatial simulation
  • Approaches for evaluating the credibility of geospatial simulation models
Student papers will be presented in an interactive short paper session with presentations no longer than five minutes and no more than ten slides. Following presentations, students will form a panel that will address questions from the audience as directed by the session moderator. Student presentations will be judged as a part of a Best Student Paper award, the winner of which will receive an award of $500.
All other papers will be placed in one of the following three sessions: (1) Methodological Advances, (2) Novel Applications, or (3) Model Credibility. Each session will be comprised of four speakers followed by a twenty-minute discussion on the session topic.
Please e-mail the abstract and key words with your expression of intent to Chris Bone by October 28, 2014. Please make sure that your abstract conforms to the AAG guidelines in relation to title, word limit and key words and as specified at http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers. An abstract should be no more than 250 words that describe the presentation’s purpose, methods, and conclusions as well as to include keywords. Full submissions will be given priority over submissions with just a paper title.
ORGANIZERS:
Chris Bone, Department of Geography, University of Oregon
Andrew Crooks, Department of Computational Social Science, George Mason University
Alison Heppenstall, School of Geography, University of Leeds
Arika Ligmann-Zielinska, Department of Geography, Michigan State University
David O’Sullivan, Department of Geography, University of California, Berkeley
TIMELINE:
October 14th, 2014: Second call for papers
October 28th, 2014: Abstract submission and expression of intent to session organizers. E-mail Chris Bone by this date if you are interested in being in this session. Please submit an abstract and key words with your expression of intent. Full submissions will be given priority over submissions with just a paper title.
October 31st, 2014: Session finalization. Session organizers determine session order and content and notify authors.
November 3rd, 2014: Final abstract submission to AAG, via www.aag.org. All participants must register individually via this site. Upon registration you will be given a participant number (PIN). Send the PIN and a copy of your final abstract to Chris Bone. Neither the organizers nor the AAG will edit the abstracts.

November 5th, 2014: AAG registration deadline. Sessions submitted to AAG for approval.
April 21-25, 2014: AAG meeting, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Continue reading »

Call for Papers: New Directions in Geospatial Simulation

New Directions In Geospatial Simulation
The geospatial simulation community has enjoyed steady growth over the past decade as novel and advanced forms of agent-based and cellular automata modeling continue to facilitate the exploration of complex geographic problems facing the world today. It is now an opportune time to consider the future direction of this community and explore ways to leverage geospatial simulation in professional arenas. The aim of these sessions is to bring together researchers utilizing agent-based and cellular automata techniques and associated methodologies to discuss new directions in geospatial simulation. We invite papers that fall into one of the following four categories:
  • Graduate student geospatial simulation research
  • Methodological advances of agent-based or cellular automata modeling
  • New application frontiers in geospatial simulation
  • Approaches for evaluating the credibility of geospatial simulation models
Student papers will be presented in an interactive short paper session with presentations no longer than five minutes and no more than ten slides. Following presentations, students will form a panel that will address questions from the audience as directed by the session moderator. Student presentations will be judged as a part of a Best Student Paper award, the winner of which will receive an award of $500.
All other papers will be placed in one of the following three sessions: (1) Methodological Advances, (2) Novel Applications, or (3) Model Credibility. Each session will be comprised of four speakers followed by a twenty-minute discussion on the session topic.
Please e-mail the abstract and key words with your expression of intent to Chris Bone by October 28, 2014. Please make sure that your abstract conforms to the AAG guidelines in relation to title, word limit and key words and as specified at http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers. An abstract should be no more than 250 words that describe the presentation’s purpose, methods, and conclusions as well as to include keywords. Full submissions will be given priority over submissions with just a paper title.
ORGANIZERS:
Chris Bone, Department of Geography, University of Oregon
Andrew Crooks, Department of Computational Social Science, George Mason University
Alison Heppenstall, School of Geography, University of Leeds
Arika Ligmann-Zielinska, Department of Geography, Michigan State University
David O’Sullivan, Department of Geography, University of California, Berkeley
TIMELINE:
October 14th, 2014: Second call for papers
October 28th, 2014: Abstract submission and expression of intent to session organizers. E-mail Chris Bone by this date if you are interested in being in this session. Please submit an abstract and key words with your expression of intent. Full submissions will be given priority over submissions with just a paper title.
October 31st, 2014: Session finalization. Session organizers determine session order and content and notify authors.
November 3rd, 2014: Final abstract submission to AAG, via www.aag.org. All participants must register individually via this site. Upon registration you will be given a participant number (PIN). Send the PIN and a copy of your final abstract to Chris Bone. Neither the organizers nor the AAG will edit the abstracts.

November 5th, 2014: AAG registration deadline. Sessions submitted to AAG for approval.
April 21-25, 2014: AAG meeting, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

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AAG 2014: Geosimulation Models Sessions

If you going to this years AAG, you might be interested in our Geosimulation Models sessions which will take place on Wednesday the 9th of April from 10am.

Session Description: Since the publication of Geosimulation in 2004, the use of Agent-based Modeling (ABM) and Cellular Automata (CA) under the umbrella of Geosimulation models within geographical systems have started to mature as methodologies to explore a wide range of geographical and more broadly social sciences problems facing society. The aim of these sessions is to bring together researchers utilizing geosimulation techniques (and associated methodologies) to discuss topics relating to: theory, technical issues and applications domains of ABM and CA within geographical systems.

10:00 AM to 11:40,  Room 39, TCC, Fourth Floor , Chair: Suzana Dragicevic
12.40PM to 2.20PM, Room 39, TCC, Fourth Floor, Chair: Paul Torrens
2:40 PM to 4:20 PM in Room 39, TCC, Fourth Floor, Chair: Paul Torrens
Siyu Fan and Yichun Xie

We would also like to thank the following AAG specialty groups for sponsoring our sessions: Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty GroupCyberinfrastructure Specialty Group and the Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group  
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AAG 2014: Geosimulation Models Sessions

If you going to this years AAG, you might be interested in our Geosimulation Models sessions which will take place on Wednesday the 9th of April from 10am.

Session Description: Since the publication of Geosimulation in 2004, the use of Agent-based Modeling (ABM) and Cellular Automata (CA) under the umbrella of Geosimulation models within geographical systems have started to mature as methodologies to explore a wide range of geographical and more broadly social sciences problems facing society. The aim of these sessions is to bring together researchers utilizing geosimulation techniques (and associated methodologies) to discuss topics relating to: theory, technical issues and applications domains of ABM and CA within geographical systems.

10:00 AM to 11:40,  Room 39, TCC, Fourth Floor , Chair: Suzana Dragicevic
12.40PM to 2.20PM, Room 39, TCC, Fourth Floor, Chair: Paul Torrens
2:40 PM to 4:20 PM in Room 39, TCC, Fourth Floor, Chair: Paul Torrens
Siyu Fan and Yichun Xie

We would also like to thank the following AAG specialty groups for sponsoring our sessions: Spatial Analysis and Modeling Specialty GroupCyberinfrastructure Specialty Group and the Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group  
Continue reading »