Latest Posts

Caren Cooper: Scientists Should Talk to the Public, but Also Listen

Caren Cooper published a blog on Scientific American website: “Scientists Should Talk to the Public, but Also Listen” which also includes a citation from me and mentioning the work of Mapping for Change. She writes: “Why is it when scientists talk to the public, they’re said to be communicating, but when the public talks to … Continue reading Caren Cooper: Scientists Should Talk to the Public, but Also Listen

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Typographical Map of London

glp_art_typographical_map_london

The Typographical Map of London, created by artist Joao Fonte, shows central London as a collection of symbols and words, arranged in a topologically representative form to show the city’s structure in a novel way. We really like the way the artist has been careful in their choice, and number, of colours, these add significantly […]

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Alan Irwin talk on Citizen Science and Scientific Citizenship (JRC, October 2015)

The EU Joint Research Centre in Ispra has recently released the recording of a talk by Alan Irwin at the Joint Research Centre as part of the STS “Contro  Corrente” series of seminars from 15 October 2015, with Jerome Ravetz and Silvio Funtowicz (famous for their post-normal science) as discussants. The talk, titled Citizen Science and Scientific Citizenship: same words, … Continue reading Alan Irwin talk on Citizen Science and Scientific Citizenship (JRC, October 2015)

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Extreme Citizen Science in Esri ArcNews

The winter edition of Esri ArcNews (which according to Mike Gould of Esri, is printed in as many copies as Forbes) includes an article on the activities of the Extreme Citizen Science group in supporting indigenous groups in mapping. The article highlights the Geographical Information Systems (GIS) aspects of the work, and mentioning many members of … Continue reading Extreme Citizen Science in Esri ArcNews

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Crossrail Station Footprints

We’ve featured Crossrail’s official construction map before, when it was showing the progress of the various TBMs (tunnel boring machines) drilling through London, but with the tunnels themselves now burrowed, it’s received a welcome update – if you zoom right in, you can now see the shape and extent of the underground stations. And they […]

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Citizen Cyberlab – notes from final review (26-27 January, Geneva)

Every project ends, eventually. The Citizen Cyberlab project was funded through the seventh framework programme of the European Union (or EU FP7 in short), and run from September 2012 to November 2015. Today marks the final review of the project in with all the project’s partners presenting the work that they’ve done during the project. The project had … Continue reading Citizen Cyberlab – notes from final review (26-27 January, Geneva)

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“Space, the Final Frontier”: How Good are Agent-Based Models at Simulating Individuals and Space in Cities?

Recently, Alison Heppenstall, Nick Malleson  and myself have just had a paper accepted in Systems entitled: “Space, the Final Frontier”: How Good are Agent-Based Models at Simulating Individuals and Space in Cities?” In the paper we critically examine how well agent-based models have  simulated a variety of urban processes. We discus what considerations are needed when choosing the appropriate level of spatial analysis and time frame to model urban phenomena and what role Big Data can play in agent-based modeling. Below you can read the abstract of the paper and see a number of example applications discussed.

Abstract: Cities are complex systems, comprising of many interacting parts. How we simulate and understand causality in urban systems is continually evolving. Over the last decade the agent-based modeling (ABM) paradigm has provided a new lens for understanding the effects of interactions of individuals and how through such interactions macro structures emerge, both in the social and physical environment of cities. However, such a paradigm has been hindered due to computational power and a lack of large fine scale datasets. Within the last few years we have witnessed a massive increase in computational processing power and storage, combined with the onset of Big Data. Today geographers find themselves in a data rich era. We now have access to a variety of data sources (e.g., social media, mobile phone data, etc.) that tells us how, and when, individuals are using urban spaces. These data raise several questions: can we effectively use them to understand and model cities as complex entities? How well have ABM approaches lent themselves to simulating the dynamics of urban processes? What has been, or will be, the influence of Big Data on increasing our ability to understand and simulate cities? What is the appropriate level of spatial analysis and time frame to model urban phenomena? Within this paper we discuss these questions using several examples of ABM applied to urban geography to begin a dialogue about the utility of ABM for urban modeling. The arguments that the paper raises are applicable across the wider research environment where researchers are considering using this approach.

Keywords: cities; agent-based modeling; big data; crime; retail; space; simulation

Figure 1. (A) System structure; (B) System hierarchy; and (C) Related subsystems/processes (adapted from Batty, 2013).

Reference cited:

Batty, M. (2013).  The New Science of Cities; MIT Press: Cambridge, MA, USA.

Full reference to the open access paper:

Heppenstall, A., Malleson, N. and Crooks A.T. (2016). “Space, the Final Frontier”: How Good are Agent-based Models at Simulating Individuals and Space in Cities?, Systems, 4(1), 9; doi: 10.3390/systems4010009 (pdf)

 

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GIScRG Sponsored Sessions 2016

The GIScience Research Group (GIScRG) is sponsoring a number of sessions at the Royal Geographical Society Annual International Conference 2016, London – 30 August to 2 September 2016. Urban Analytics GeoComputation; The Next Twenty Years The City Information Nexus: Modelling The Future City Learning Gis: Establishing The Nexus Between Disciplines Methods For Assessing Resilience And … Continue reading GIScRG Sponsored Sessions 2016

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Lumiere London

Lumiere London is a festival of light and art taking place every evening until this Sunday. From 6:30-10pm, nearly 30 temporary artworks in central London will come alive with lights. From a holographic elephant to neon sausage-dogs and a strange organic-looking structure suspended over London’s principal crossroads (Oxford Circus), it’s a great excuse to brave […]

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4Candles Prayer system upgrade at St Michael’s church in Hawkshead

In the weeks leading up to Christmas, we replaced the hardware that was running the digital 4Candles prayer system in St Michael’s church in Hawkshead. One of the reasons for the system upgrade was to attempt to improve and/or deal with poor network connectivity that the system relies so heavily […]

The post 4Candles Prayer system upgrade at St Michael’s church in Hawkshead appeared first on CEDE.

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Fully funded PhD Studentship, Hull York Medical School, How healthy are older migrants?

TweetThe Hull York Medical School, UK, invites application for a fully funded PhD studentship in applied health research How healthy are older migrants? Health between migrants and the local population often differs in that migrants frequently have a health advantage over the resident population when they first enter a country. This so called healthy migrant […]

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Dwelling Ages

The Valuation Office Agency publish some interesting open data sets from time-to-time. One that caught my eye recently was a breakdown of counts of residential buildings in each small area (LSOA, around 700 houses) by the decade that they were built in. The data is not perfect for mapping – pre-1900 is grouped together into […]

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New publication: Citizen Science and the Nexus (water, energy, food, population)

Under the leadership of Roger Fradera of the Centre for Environmental Policy at Imperial College London, I was involved as a co-author on a ‘thinkpiece’ about citizen science and the nexus. If you haven’t come across the term, ‘nexus’ is the linkage of food, energy, water and the environment as a major challenge for the future. The paper is … Continue reading New publication: Citizen Science and the Nexus (water, energy, food, population)

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Measles Vaccination Narrative in Twitter

A summary of our approach
Continuing our work with respects to GeoSocial analysis we have recently published a paper in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance entitled “The Measles Vaccination Narrative in Twitter: A Quantitative Analysis“. In this paper we explore how social media can be quantitatively studied to explore the narrative behind measles vaccinations. Below you can read the abstract to the paper which includes the background to why we chose to study this topic, the study objective, our methodology, a summary of our results and conclusions. 
Background: The emergence of social media is providing an alternative avenue for information exchange and opinion formation on health-related issues. Collective discourse in such media leads to the formation of a complex narrative, conveying public views and perceptions.

Objective: This paper presents a study of Twitter narrative regarding vaccination in the aftermath of the 2015 measles outbreak, both in terms of its cyber and physical characteristics. The contributions of this work are the analysis of the data for this particular study, as well as presenting a quantitative interdisciplinary approach to analyze such open-source data in the context of health narratives.

Methods: 669,136 tweets were collected in the period February 1 through March 9, 2015 referring to vaccination. These tweets were analyzed to identify key terms, connections among such terms, retweet patterns, the structure of the narrative, and connections to the geographical space.

Results: The data analysis captures the anatomy of the themes and relations that make up the discussion about vaccination in Twitter. The results highlight the higher impact of stories contributed by news organizations compared to direct tweets by health organizations in communicating health-related information. They also capture the structure of the anti-vaccination narrative and its terms of reference. Analysis also revealed the relationship between community engagement in Twitter and state policies regarding child vaccination. Residents of Vermont and Oregon, the two states with the highest rates of non-medical exemption from school-entry vaccines nationwide, are leading the social media discussion in terms of participation.

Conclusions: The interdisciplinary study of health-related debates in social media across the cyber-physical debate nexus leads to a greater understanding of public concerns, views, and responses to health-related issues. Further coalescing such capabilities shows promise towards advancing health communication, supporting the design of more effective strategies that take into account the complex and evolving public views of health issues.

Global distribution of tweets in our data corpus
The paper is open access and can be viewed and downloaded from here.
Full reference:
Radzikowski, J., Stefanidis, A., Jacobsen K.H., Croitoru, A., Crooks, A.T. and Delamater, P.L. (2016). “The Measles Vaccination Narrative in Twitter: A Quantitative Analysis”, JMIR Public Health and Surveillance, 2(1):e1. 

Hashtag associations: clustering based on co-occurrences of hashtags in individual tweets
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La matematica dell’amore: quante probabilità abbiamo di incontrare l’anima gemella? – State of Mind (Blog)


State of Mind (Blog)
La matematica dell’amore: quante probabilità abbiamo di incontrare l’anima gemella?
State of Mind (Blog)
Cercando di renderla semplice, nel suo libro “La matematica dell’amore” Hannah Fry, docente all’UCL Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis di Londra, esemplifica la cosa così. Mettiamo che a una festa ci siano 3 ragazzi e 3 ragazze, e che siano tutti

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L’amore matematico: quante probabilità abbiamo di incontrare l’amore? – State of Mind (Blog)


State of Mind (Blog)
L’amore matematico: quante probabilità abbiamo di incontrare l’amore?
State of Mind (Blog)
Cercando di renderla semplice, nel suo libro “La matematica dell’amore” Hannah Fry, docente all’UCL Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis di Londra, esemplifica la cosa così. Mettiamo che a una festa ci siano 3 ragazzi e 3 ragazze, e che siano tutti

and more »

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7 brilliant leadership lessons I learned this year – Business Insider


Business Insider
7 brilliant leadership lessons I learned this year
Business Insider
Hannah Fry, a mathematician at the UCL Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis in London and author of “The Mathematics of Love”, says exploiting the Gale-Shapley matching algorithm can help you hire the best possible candidates. Essentially, the

and more »

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The Age of Buildings

We don’t have open individual building age data in the UK, unlike in some other countries (the data has been used to great effect in New York City and Amsterdam) but the Valuation Office Agency, which amongst other things decides council tax bandings for residential properties in England and Wales, has published some interesting data … Continue reading The Age of Buildings

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This amazing map shows how urbanisation has accelerated since 1950 – CityMetric


CityMetric
This amazing map shows how urbanisation has accelerated since 1950
CityMetric
David Smith, at UCL’s Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, has come up with a clever map to help us visualise all this. Drawing on UN data from 1950, 1990 and 2015, and projections for 2030, his map uses circles of different colours to represent the …

and more »

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How we ended up exploring a church through the windscreen of an X-Wing – CityMetric

How we ended up exploring a church through the windscreen of an X-Wing
CityMetric
David Smith, at UCL’s Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, has come up with a clever map to help us visualise all this. Drawing on UN data from 1950, 1990 and 2015, and projections for 2030, his map uses circles of different colours to represent the …

and more »

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Can you identify these places from a medieval map? – CityMetric


CityMetric
Can you identify these places from a medieval map?
CityMetric
David Smith, at UCL’s Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, has come up with a clever map to help us visualise all this. Drawing on UN data from 1950, 1990 and 2015, and projections for 2030, his map uses circles of different colours to represent the …

and more »

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It’s Christmas, so here are 11 beautiful isochrone maps showing travel times … – CityMetric


CityMetric
It’s Christmas, so here are 11 beautiful isochrone maps showing travel times
CityMetric
David Smith, at UCL’s Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, has come up with a clever map to help us visualise all this. Drawing on UN data from 1950, 1990 and 2015, and projections for 2030, his map uses circles of different colours to represent the …

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Citizen Science: theory, practice & policy 

As part of the Israeli Geographical Association meeting in Jerusalem, I was asked to give a half day workshop on “Citizen Science: theory, practice and policy (with case studies from UK & Germany)”. The workshop learning objectives: Knowledge of the field of citizen science and current trends that influence it Understand the principles and practical … Continue reading Citizen Science: theory, practice & policy 

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SmellyMaps

SmellyMaps reveals the “olfactory footprint of London” – the streets which are dominated by traffic fumes, the animal smells emanating out from London Zoo, and the influence of parks and greenspaces on London’s scent experience. Streets are measured for four smell groupings – emissions (coloured red on the map), nature (green), food (blue) and animals […]

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