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DITOs final event (2): Doing It Together beyond DITOs

This is the second part of the plenary element of the DITOs final event and again, I’m reblogging Alice Sheppard’s notes (and editing them lightly): The second part of the This is a continuation after the morning’s sessions. The session is based on a panel of other projects that have done work in Europe separately from … Continue reading DITOs final event (2): Doing It Together beyond DITOs

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Doing It Together Science (DITOs) final event talks (part 1)

This is a reblogging of the reporting from DITOs final event, which was blogged by Alice Sheppard (which I’ve edited, lightly): Introduction to the day Camille Pisani, the Director of RBINS praises numerous volunteers and collaborators who have worked together, and the way different activities have been aimed at reaching many different audiences. There have … Continue reading Doing It Together Science (DITOs) final event talks (part 1)

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European Citizen Science General Assembly 2019

The assembly run at the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS) which is located in the Museum of Natural Sciences. ECSA Vice-Chair, Lucy Robinson, will be stepping down this time. ECSA have a team of 6 people that are involved in various projects and activities of the working groups. Some of the highlights from … Continue reading European Citizen Science General Assembly 2019

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Citizen Science 2019: Indigenous People on the Front Lines: Using Citizen Science to Improve Environmental Public Health

The session “Indigenous People on the Front Lines: Using Citizen Science to Improve Environmental Public Health” was organised by Judith Zelikoff (NYU medicine), Kathleen Vandiver (MIT), Esther Erdei (University New Mexico / Missouri Breaks Industries Research Inc.), Shirley VanDunk (Ramapough Lenape Tribe) Judith  – they are part of the NIEHS, and Esther is in the … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: Indigenous People on the Front Lines: Using Citizen Science to Improve Environmental Public Health

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Citizen Science 2019: Ethical Considerations in Funded Citizen Science: Implications for Broader Impacts

The session Ethical Considerations in Funded Citizen Science: Implications for Broader Impacts, organise by Jacqueline Vadjunec (NSF), Fay Cobb Payton (NSF), Todd Kuiken (NC State University), Lisa Rasmussen (UNC Charlotte), Brenda Wilson Evon Connally (UNC Charlotte), Stacy Lynn (CitSci.org), Caren Cooper (NCSU), John Parker (NSF) The Jacquie is in the Geography division of NSF, and the … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: Ethical Considerations in Funded Citizen Science: Implications for Broader Impacts

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Citizen Science 2019: Designing technology to maximize cultural diversity, uptake, and outcomes of citizen science

This blog post was written by Michelle Neil of ACSA with edits by me (yay! collaborative note taking!) (apologies for getting names wrong!)  The session was structured in the following way: first, each person presented their issue, and then they answer questions that were presented by other panel members. The questions that we managed to … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: Designing technology to maximize cultural diversity, uptake, and outcomes of citizen science

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Citizen Science 2019: Citizen Science in Action: A Tale of Four Advocates Who Would Have Lost Without You

Jessica Culpepper (Public Justice), Larry Baldwin (Crystal Coast Waterkeeper), Matt Helper (Appalachian Voices),  Michael Krochta (Bark).  Jessica – there can be a disconnect between the work on the ground and how it is used in advocacy. On how to use the information to make the world a better place, and hold polluters to account. First, Michael Krochta (Bark) from … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: Citizen Science in Action: A Tale of Four Advocates Who Would Have Lost Without You

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Citizen Science 2019: Environmental Justice and Community Science: A Social Movement for Inpowerment, Compliance, and Action

The session was opened by Na’Taki Osborne-Jelks, Agnes Scott College (CSA board) – the environmental justice movement have used methods of community science we need to include in the tent of citizen science. There are 60 participants in the conference that are supported by the NSF to participate in the conference. There was a special effort … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: Environmental Justice and Community Science: A Social Movement for Inpowerment, Compliance, and Action

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Citizen Science 2019: Citizen Science: Creating Authentic Learning Opportunities for Students

The second day opened with an introduction to Kenan Fellows https://kenanfellows.org/ which is a programme to link teachers and provide STEM experience, and therefore they integrate citizen science in schools. Following this, Rachael Polmanteer, who is marine biologist turned 8th-grade science teacher, gave a keynote. Rachael is from Bath, New York (state) and she grows … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: Citizen Science: Creating Authentic Learning Opportunities for Students

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Citizen Science 2019: Citizen Social Science for Environmental Public Health Research

There are specific challenges for citizen social science – e.g. personal information, ethics Lisa Lundgren (NCSU) and Steve Prince (EPA). Steve Prince – behavioural economist, and covering the SmokeSense app. Smoke Sense is about wildfire Smoke exposure. The problem that is addressing is thick smoke that blanket an area – different people might react differently … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: Citizen Social Science for Environmental Public Health Research

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Citizen Science 2019: opening talk “The Power (Relations) of Citizen Science.”

The first day of the conference started with Angel Hjarding, the conference chair opened the conference, with over 800 participants. The conference was strongly supported by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Welcomes addresses came from the North Carolina Secretary of Natural and Cultural Resources, Susi Hamilton who highlighted the state support to the natural … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: opening talk “The Power (Relations) of Citizen Science.”

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Citizen Science 2019: Getting your project off the ground workshop

The workshop was held as part of the Citizen Science 2019 conference and organised by Katrina Theisz (National Institutes of Health), Jennifer Couch (National Science Foundation), Ellen McCallie (National Science Foundation), Alison Parker (EPA), Pietro Michelucci (Human Computation Institute, Inc) , Claire Baert (Thin Crowd) Ellen McCallie started the day on how to write a … Continue reading Citizen Science 2019: Getting your project off the ground workshop

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How the Victorians Mapped London’s Cholera

It is, of course, John Snow who is credited with using maps to demonstrate that the clusters of deaths from cholera in London’s Soho during London’s 1854 outbreak were caused by contaminated water. This marked a major shift in thinking away from the disease being transmitted through dirty air: the more widely accepted theory at […]

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Dockless Bikeshare in London: Part 2

The Guardian newspaper has published an online article about the rise and fall of dockless bikeshare, focusing on the pure dockless systems in England (there aren’t any in the rest of the UK) that grew in 2017, and then shrank last autumn. The article extensively used some of the geospatial boundary data that I have … Continue reading Dockless Bikeshare in London: Part 2

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EU-Citizen.Science project kick-off meeting

The EU-Citizen.Science is a new project that is part of a family of citizen science projects that are funded through the Science with and for Society (SwafS) stream of the Horizon 2020 programme. The project started in January and will run for 3 years. It is coordinated by the Natural History Museum of Berlin (the … Continue reading EU-Citizen.Science project kick-off meeting

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Tube Station Stress!

From conference facility organisers PowWowNow comes this map/infographic showing the worst tube stations in central London for stress. They’ve produced a simple index of tube station stress by combining minutes of station-specific delays for tube trains, with the total numbers of people entering/exiting the station, and counting negative/mixed social media (mainly Twitter) posts. All three […]

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International students in Scotland, Brexit and beyond

12th Feb 2019 PGRG Blog #16 David McCollum, Paula Duffy and Charlotte Barke   Scotland’s ability to attract international students in an increasingly competitive marketplace could be severely hindered by immigration policy, rhetoric, and Brexit negotiations. We need to protect the important economic, demographic and cultural benefits that come along with our international student community … More International students in Scotland, Brexit and beyond

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London Suburban Lines 1939 (Modern Reproduction)

This lovely schematic diagram was first created in 1939 by George Dow. It shows the three LNER (London and North Eastern Railway) north London networks – radiating out from the Marylebone, King’s Cross, and Liverpool Street/Fenchurch Street London terminii, in a single map. Unusually, the map includes a series of pictograms, illustrating nearby facilities, leisure […]

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