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Call for Papers – 17th European Colloquium on Quantitative and Theoretical Geography (ECQTG2011)

Click here for FULL DETAILS. The organising committee for the European Colloquium of Quantitative and Theoretical Geography (ECQTG2011) would like to invite submissions of abstracts for their 17th conference, to take place at the Harokopio University of Athens, Greece, from the 2nd – 5th September 2011. The conference is formally organised by the Greek Society for […]

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Geodemographics and spatial interaction: an integrated model for higher education

Spatial interaction modelling and geodemographic analysis have each developed as quite separate research traditions. In this paper, we present an integrated model that harnesses the power of spatial interaction modelling to behavioural insights derived from a geodemographic classification. This approach is applied to the modelling of participation in higher education (HE). A novel feature of […]

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Geodemographics and spatial interaction: an integrated model for higher education

Spatial interaction modelling and geodemographic analysis have each developed as quite separate research traditions. In this paper, we present an integrated model that harnesses the power of spatial interaction modelling to behavioural insights derived from a geodemographic classification. This approach is applied to the modelling of participation in higher education (HE). A novel feature of the paper is the integration of national schools, colleges and HE data; a national model is then calibrated and tested against actual recorded flows of students into HE. The model is implemented within a Java framework and is presented as a first step towards providing a quantitative tool that can be used by HE stakeholders to explore policies relating to such topics as widening access to under-represented groups.

Singleton, A.D., Alan G Wilson, and Oliver O’Brien. 2012. “Geodemographics and Spatial Interaction: An Integrated Model for Higher Education.” Journal of Geographical Systems 14 (2): 223–241. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10109-010-0141-5.

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Call for Papers – RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2011

Abstracts are invited for a session at the annual conference of the Royal Geographical Society – Institute of British Geographers annual conference 2011. The conference theme is the ‘Geographical Imagination’, and will take place from 31st August – 2nd September, in London. Sessions may take the form of presented papers, panels, practitioner forums, discussions or workshops. […]

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The geodemographics of educational progression and their implications for widening participation in higher education

This paper addresses our ability to analyse progression rates into UK Higher Education (HE) using a range of data available at the individual and neighbourhood levels. The then Department for Children, Schools and Families has recently released data which make it possible to profile national patterns of student educational progression from post-compulsory schooling through to […]

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The geodemographics of educational progression and their implications for widening participation in higher education

This paper addresses our ability to analyse progression rates into UK Higher Education (HE) using a range of data available at the individual and neighbourhood levels. The then Department for Children, Schools and Families has recently released data which make it possible to profile national patterns of student educational progression from post-compulsory schooling through to university. However, the linked records lack detailed socioeconomic information, and thus a geodemographic classification is used to analyse the flows of students from different sociospatial backgrounds into the HE system. Rates of progression are shown to vary greatly between these groups, and a disaggregation of HE participants by courses of study demonstrates that the abilities of institutions to attract students from different backgrounds will be constrained by the mix of their course offerings.

Singleton A D, 2010, “The geodemographics of educational progression and their implications for widening participation in higher educationEnvironment and Planning A 42(11) 2560 – 2580

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Estimating secondary school catchment areas and the spatial equity of access

Following the Educational Reform Act of 1988, families in England and Wales have been free to identify a preferred school for their children’s secondary education. However, as part of this open selection, the demand from parents opting to send their children to the best performing schools far outstrips the supply of available places at them, […]

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Estimating secondary school catchment areas and the spatial equity of access

Following the Educational Reform Act of 1988, families in England and Wales have been free to identify a preferred school for their children’s secondary education. However, as part of this open selection, the demand from parents opting to send their children to the best performing schools far outstrips the supply of available places at them, and consequently many schools ration places using entry criteria that favour those pupils domiciled close to the school. Through this geographic selection process, choice is spatially sorted and access to the best schools is often crucially dependent upon where parents live. After illustrating this problem, this paper develops an automated modelling technique that can be used to define and map school catchment areas based on the home locations of pupils attending every publically funded school in England. It then develops this framework to create a web based decision support tool to aid parents seeking secondary school places.

Singleton, A.D., Longley, P.A., Allen, R., O’Brien, O. (2010) Estimating secondary school catchment areas and the spatial equity of access. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems doi:10.1016/j.compenvurbsys.2010.09.006

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ArcGIS 10 – Field Calculator and Python

Python has been more tightly integrated in the new release of ArcGIS 10, allowing scripting to occur directly through a Python process without even opening up ArcMap. Admittedly this was available before, but now everything is more tightly coupled and a lot cleaner in it’s implementation. However, what has really interested, and indeed confused me […]

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