Working Lines

As a followup to Tube Tongues I’ve published Working Lines which is exactly the same concept, except it looks at the occupation statistics from the 2011 census, and shows the most popular occupation by tube station. Again, lots of spatial clustering of results, and some interesting trends come out – for example, the prevalence of […]

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Tube Tongues

I’ve extended my map of tube journeys and busy stations (previous article here) to add in an interesting metric from the 2011 census – that of the second most commonly spoken language (after English) that people who live nearby speak. To do this I’ve analysed all “output areas” which wholly or partly lie within 200m […]

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OpenLayers 3

As a learning exercise, I have attempted to “migrate” my #indyref map from OpenLayers 2.13.1 to OpenLayers 3.0.0. It seemed a good time to learn this, because the OpenLayers website now shows v3 as the default version for people to download and use. I use the term “migrate” in inverted commas, because, really, OpenLayers 3 […]

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From Putney to Poplar: 12 Million Journeys on the London Bikeshare

The above graphic (click for full version) shows 12.4 million bicycle journeys taken on the Barclays Cycle Hire system in London over seven months, from 13 December 2013, when the south-west expansion to Putney and Hammersmith went live, until 19 July 2014 – the latest journey data available from Transport for London’s Open Data portal. It’s an update of a […]

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DataShine: 2011 OAC

The 2011 Area Classification for Output Areas, or 2011 OAC, is a geodemographic classification that was developed by Dr Chris Gale during his Ph.D at UCL Geography over the last few years, in close conjunction with the Office for National Statistics, who have endorsed it and adopted it as their official classification and who collected […]

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Borough Tops

The Diamond Geezer is, this month, climbing the highest tops in each one of London’s 33 boroughs. To find the highest points, he’s used a number of websites which list the places. These derive the data from contour lines, perhaps supplemented with GPS or other measurements. However, another interesting – and new – datasource for […]

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Labels!

The labels that appear on the map add some context, and help you find out where you are, but we realise that sometimes these labels can be less than helpful, and can obscure the data. With this in mind, we have now added a “Labels” button, beside the “Buildings” button, at the bottom. Clicking this […]

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DataShine Website updates

DataShine has been out for around a week now, and we’ve made some changes to fix small bugs. Specifically: DataShine should work much better in Internet Explorer 9 now, as we now prompt this browser to use compatibility mode, with which the website displays correctly. When showing a dataset that diverges around the mean, we […]

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A Changing City – OS Open Data Reveals a Dynamic London

Since launching the data store in early 2010, the Ordnance Survey have been releasing a number of updates to an interesting dataset – VectorMap District – which is a generalisation and simplification of their MasterMap “gold standard” dataset for Great Britain. The updates have been appearing roughly every 6-12 months, and by comparing them in […]

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A Changing City – OS Open Data Reveals a Dynamic London

Since launching the data store in early 2010, the Ordnance Survey have been releasing a number of updates to an interesting dataset – VectorMap District – which is a generalisation and simplification of their MasterMap “gold standard” dataset for Great Britain. The updates have been appearing roughly every 6-12 months, and by comparing them in […]

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