Latest Posts

Election 2010: Where Were All the Votes?

Using the General Election 2010 results spreadsheet from the Guardian Data Blog, we’ve produced three MapTube maps showing the distribution of votes for the three main parties:    The maps can be viewed on MapTube at the following link: http://www.maptube.org/election/map.aspx?s=DGxUpxGSnLKhUzLIOMHBwKeUwKZUyEDAwcCnksCjlMhBwMHAp5LAoTbd Use the red slider buttons to fade the distributions for the three parties up and down. […]

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NYC Cab Flow Data

NYC Yellow Cabs have GPS fitted to them which have been tracked for the past year or so… anyway, there is an excellent article on this in the New York Times with obligatory map visualization:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/03/nyregion/03icab.html
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AAG Lifetime Achievement Award – Professor Ron Johnston

Long standing QMRG member Professor Ron Johnston (University of Bristol) has been given a lifetime achievement award from the Association of American Geographers (AAG). Johnston, has been a major influence on the discipline both through his research and writing and his professional engagement. His scholarly productivity has always been exceptional, now standing in aggregate at […]

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2010 Quantitative Methods Undergraduate Dissertation Prize

The QMRG are happy to receive nominations for this year’s best undergraduate dissertation in *any* area of quantitative geography. Topics may include the application of existing techniques or the development of new ones in physical, human or environmental studies. Entries are limited to undergraduate students completing BSc / BA level dissertations in UK higher education […]

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Lost in Translation: Cross-Cultural Experiences in Teaching Geo-Genealogy

This paper reports on a cross-cultural outreach activity of the current UK ‘Spatial Literacy in Teaching’ (SPLINT) Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL), a past UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grant, and shared interests in family names between Japanese and UK academics. It describes a pedagogic programme developed for Japanese postgraduates and advanced undergraduates that entailed quantitative and qualitative analysis of the spatial distributions of Japanese family names. The authors describe some specific semantic, procedural and theoretical issues and, more generally, suggest how names analysis provides a common framework for engaging student interest in GIS.

Paul A. Longley; Alex D. Singleton; Keiji Yano; Tomoki Nakaya

Longley, Paul A., A.D. Singleton, Keiji Yano, and Tomoki Nakaya. 2010. “Lost in Translation: Cross-Cultural Experiences in Teaching Geo-Genealogy.” Journal of Geography in Higher Education 34 (1): 21–38. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03098260902982476.

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ENFOLD: Explaining, modelliNg, and FOrecasting gLobal Dynamics

ENFOLD: Explaining, modelliNg, and FOrecasting gLobal Dynamics Pablo Mateos participates in a successful CASA-led £2.9 million bid to EPSRC involving seven UCL departments and ten academics. ENFOLD is a multidisplinary five year modelling project funded by EPSRC (£2.9 million FEC) … Continue reading

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New UCL collaboration with Mexico National University (UNAM)

A research collaboration in urban and population geography has recently being set up between Dr. Pablo Mateos (UCL) and Dr. Adrian Guillermo Aguilar, at the Mexico National University (UNAM), one of the the most prestigious university in Latin America and … Continue reading

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Locating the Latino community in Britain

Dr Pablo Mateos gave a seminar on October 7th, at the Bolivar Hall of the Venezuelan Consulate, organised by the Alianza Iberoamericana. He presented a first attempt to measure the size and geographical distribution of the Latin or Iberian-American community … Continue reading

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